Pelvic Floor Disorder

Pelvic floor disorders are common postnatal. However, they are not normal and should not be pushed off to the side. We provide exercises to help you achieve a healthier and properly functioning pelvic floor, creating a better quality of life. Don’t live with symptoms because you think they are an inevitable consequence of childbirth.

About Pelvic Floor Disorder

Studies show that 46% of women have at least one pelvic floor disorder (PFD). PFD refers to any condition affecting the pelvic floor, including urinary incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse, or pelvic pain. These disorders happen when the pelvic floor muscles become tight or weakened.

The pelvic floor is a muscle group that acts like a hammock providing structure and support to the pelvic organs. During pregnancy, the pelvic floor needs to stretch to help with the preparation of delivery. Vaginal birth, assisted vaginal delivery, and injury to the pelvic diaphragm can all contribute to PFD.

  • Vaginal Birth 
    • When in active labor, the pelvic floor needs to relax and stretch to allow the baby to pass through. When the muscles are unable to stretch, this can cause trauma to the pelvic floor. Research has shown a connection between vaginal birth and urinary incontinence, and pelvic organ prolapse.
  • Assisted Vaginal Birth
      • The use of instruments (forceps, vacuum, episiotomy) in delivery can increase PFD risk. Using these interventions, we are putting extra force and stretch on the pelvic floor muscles causing injury. When there is an injury to the body, the body will lay down scar tissue. Scar tissue will bind normal tissue with abnormal tissue creating a dysfunction activation pattern. This pattern can cause urinary incontinence and pain during intercourse. 
  • Pelvic Diaphragm Injury
    • The pelvic diaphragm is created by the levator ani muscle, which plays a vital role in supporting the pelvic organs. 91% of women seven weeks postnatal showed injury to the levator ani muscle or pubic bone. Direct trauma to the levator ani muscle causes an increased risk of urinary incontinence.

Symptoms of Pelvic Floor Disorder

  • Incontinence 
    • Leaking with sneezing, laughing, coughing, jumping, lifting heavy are all signs of PFD
  • Constipation
  • Pelvic pain or pressure
  • Low back pain
  • Hemorrhoids
  • Pain with intercourse, bowel movements, or urination

Your Visit With US

Pelvic floor disorders are common postnatal. However, they are not normal and should not be pushed off to the side. Our St. George chiropractors, will evaluate your core stability in relationship with your pelvic floor muscles and pelvis. Then, we will provide therapeutic exercises to help you achieve a healthier and properly functioning pelvic floor, creating a better quality of life. Don’t live with symptoms because you think they are an inevitable consequence of childbirth.

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Crux Sport & Spine

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